Baywatch: Sizzling, Sandy, Summer Fun!

Like it or not, summer is here. And here in the US, summer means more than sweltering days, pretending to be interested in baseball and unfortunate tan lines. Summertime also heralds in the release of a myriad of (typically sub-par) films that we have lovingly dubbed “summer blockbusters.” The summer blockbuster is a well-loved, time-honored…

Kedi: a Film Review

Istanbul is home to thousands of stray cats that freely roam the city’s streets, making homes in the city’s communities and building relationships with the city’s people. Kedi is a heart-warming documentary that brings to light the complex relationship between Istanbul and her feline friends. The film follows the day-to-day lives of seven of the…

A Million Reasons why Lady Gaga’s “Joanne” is Her Best Album to Date

Admittedly, I am more than a little late to this train. For me, Lady Gaga lost most of her lustre something like 5 years ago. At the beginning of her career, I worshiped her for the same reasons everyone else did. I adored her catchy dance tunes (so much so that I blame The Fame for at least one speeding ticket,) I found her avant-garde fashion sense to be entirely mesmerizing, I was both shocked and emboldened by her blatant sexuality, and like so many others I loved the way she was so willing to use her music and celebrity…

All Grown Up: A Book Review

Jami Attenberg’s All Grown Up is a poignant examination of the disappointment of life not quite working out, and how a person can forge their identity in spite of it. One thing that people often lose sight of as they wind their way through life is that every individual experiences hardship, struggles with who they are, and has something dark and troubling in their past. Often, people are guilty of thinking of themselves as the only individuals who are having to endure trials and tribulations, but books are good reminders that this isn’t the case. Attenberg’s protagonist Andrea Bern is…

News of the World: a Book Review

According to Amazon, News of the World by Paulette Jiles was one of the best books of 2016. After reading it, I have to say I whole-heartedly agree. This novel is compelling, deeply moving, and competently renders a portrait of a largely forgotten America.

2017 Reading Project: Katherine Philips

It’s time for my newest installment of my 2017 reading project. This edition focuses on the first female poet to become popular during her own life time. Katherine Philips wrote about her political convictions, marriage, and the beauty of female friendships.

Women’s History Month Resumed

I have really fallen short with my devotion to Women’s History Month. My goal was to feature one woman per day on my blog, but alas! I set my bar too high, and could not meet my own standard. It has been a busy month as I’ve been working extra shifts because I have a large tax bill to pay next month, I’ve also had to make multiple trips to the dentist and now I’m battling a small bout of illness. No matter, I shall take this time to resume my dedication to recognizing admirable women. Reader, you are in…

Margaret Cavendish

Today’s post is a two-fer. Two-for-one. Margaret Cavendish is listed on my 2017 reading project, and this is Women’s History Month, so what better way to celebrate her life and work? You know the saying “well behaved women rarely make history?” Margaret’s life and work prove that that expression is not without merit. Despite having…

Min Jin Lee

After two days of skipping out on my devotion to Women’s History Month, I’ve decided to return with an entry about the deeply moving novel I just finished and its’ brilliant author. Pachinko was my February Book of the Month Club selection, and I’m patting myself on the back for picking this baby out! There…

Dolly Parton

My fourth installment in my tribute to Women’s History Month is the mesmerizing Dolly Parton. Facts about Dolly are widely available, so this is just a quickie post to tell the world what I love about her.